Early Review: The Island by S. Usher Evans

Title: The Island
Series: Madion War Trilogy #1
Author: S. Usher Evans
Genre: YA Fantasy/Dystopian
Publisher: Sun's Golden Day Publishing
Publication Date:  April 26th, 2016
Page Count:  260 pages
Format:  eARC
Source: From author in exchange of an honest review


Summary:
Prince Galian is third in line to the throne, but prefers his place as a resident at the Royal Kylaen Hospital. When his father urges him to join the military to help reclaim their colony, Galian is forced to put aside his oath to Do No Harm and fight a war he does not believe in.

Across the great Madion Sea, Captain Theo Kallistrate dreams of a day when she is no longer bound by conscription to fight for her country's independence. But when the Kylaens threaten, honor and duty call her to the front lines to fight off the oppressors.

When an air skirmish goes wrong, both Theo and Galian crash on a remote island hundreds of miles from either nation. Grievously injured, Theo must rely on Galian's medical expertise, and Galian must rely on Theo's survival skills, to live another day in a harsh and unforgiving terrain.

Can they put aside their differences long enough to survive? Or will the war that brought them to the island tear them apart?

The Island is the first in a new romance trilogy by S. Usher Evans, author of the Razia series and Empath. 
*The Reader's Review*
My rating: 4/5 stars

Guys, have I mentioned that I love the Blue Lagoon? It's a film that dates back to 1980 and it's about a man and two babies (boy and girl) that get stuck on an Island called Blue Lagoon (I think) and after the guy dies, they both grow up there and learn how to survive on their own away from civilization and such. It's really good.

OH! And have you all seen Cast Away starring Tom Hanks (Wilsoooon *cries*). It's another great movie in which the guy finds himself in an Island after his airplane crashes and spends a looong time on his own, eating fish, drinking coconut water and talking to his good old buddy Wilson, the volley ball.


Anyway, my point here is that The Island by S. Usher Evans is a mighty fine example of what happens when you suddenly find yourself stranded on an Island. With no way of getting out of it. Without resources. And with your nation's sworn enemy.

I had a really great time reading this book and I was done with it before I knew it! From page one I was sucked into Theo's and Galian's sides of the story (alternating POVs!) and it was interesting to learn how different both of their lives were from each other before they shoot each other out off the sky meet. Galian being a prince of Kylaen, used to luxury and a hearty breakfast every morning. Theo a Captain of the opposing country wanting independence, used to fighting for her life every single day.

When they both find themselves on the Island somewhere in the Madion Sea, Galian and Theo, after a rough beginning, manage to push the war and their prejudices to the back of their minds and slowly learn to trust and to lean on each other's skills to get to live for another day. But they can't deny the call of the Island!  Because the more time they spend with each other and their defenses start to crumble in order to survive, they quickly move past from their need to kill each other to... more. *wink*


The romance that blooms between them is sweet, but the kind that can only end with heart break. For when or IF they ever manage to get out of the Island, war will be back on their shoulders and they will be enemies once again. *cries*

I'm looking forward to read the next book in the trilogy since the ending of this book left me a bit upset and I feel that I need to learn more about the two warring countries. Up until this point, I'm not sure which side is the good side, but I guess not knowing IS part of the fun, right?

I do recommend for you to pick up a copy of The Island once it comes out and loose yourself in a story of war, love, and survival. 

1 comment:

  1. This sounds pretty interesting. Not sure if it's for me but I'm intrigued to see your reviews for the other books.

    ReplyDelete